You need to rollback to a previous commit and don’t care about recent changes. What commands should you use?

If you need to rollback to a previous commit and don’t care about any recent changes, the best approach is to use the git reset command with the --hard option. This will move the branch pointer back to the specified commit and discard all changes made after that commit, effectively removing any recent changes.

Here’s how you can do it:

  1. First, find the commit hash of the commit you want to reset to. You can use git log to view the commit history and find the hash of the desired commit.
  2. Open a terminal or command prompt and navigate to your Git repository.
  3. Perform the hard reset using the git reset --hard command with the commit hash you want to reset to:
git reset --hard <commit-hash>

Replace <commit-hash> with the hash of the commit you want to rollback to.

After running the git reset --hard command, your branch will be set to the state of the specified commit, and all changes made after that commit will be permanently discarded. Be cautious when using git reset --hard as it will remove any changes in your working directory that have not been committed.

Important Note: If you have already pushed the recent changes to a remote repository, be cautious when using git reset --hard because it will rewrite the history of the branch. If other team members are also working on the same branch, they may face conflicts when trying to push their changes. In such cases, consider using git revert or communicating with your team to coordinate the rollback process.

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